Puerto Rico Economic Pulse ©

08/18: Code of Conduct – Fiscal Oversight Board

Insights into the fiscal discipline of PROMESA staff in Puerto Rico

Code of Conduct – Fiscal Oversight Board Puerto RicoPuerto Rico’s fiscal and economic crisis has thrust people into unlikely roles. On June 2016, President Barack Obama signed the legislation Puerto Rico Oversight Management, & Economic Stability Act to address Puerto Rico’s economic crisis. The Act established a 7-member oversight board with an Executive Director and staff to, among other things, provide Puerto Rico with tools to impose discipline over its finances, meet is obligations, and restore confidence in its institutions. The Board has sweeping powers over the Island and its staff has a significant and increasing budget, paid by PR taxpayers, to execute those powers. After the devastation of Hurricane Maria on September 2017, the economic reconstruction of the Island becomes even more important for PR to meet its fiscal and debt obligations. Is the entity in charge of balancing fiscal budgets and controlling expenses in PR applying these same principles to its expenses? It is in this context that this issue analyzes how the administrative staff of the Fiscal Board stacks against results.

04/2018: A New Privatization Model for PREPA

Competition can support Puerto Rico’s future

PrivatizationThe aftermath of hurricanes Irma and Maria essentially sealed PR Electric Power Authority’s (PREPA) fate, at least in its current legal form. The magnitude of the physical destruction experienced both by its generation capacity and its distribution networks renewed historical calls for its privatization. That possibility now seems irreversible, particularly given the Fiscal Oversight Board’s (FOB) drive to impose austerity across the public sector and the government’s market-friendliness inclination. However, not all privatization processes are the same and, by extension, not all lead to the same outcome. This issue of Pulse presents a novel approach to privatization—one based on the controlled introduction of competition in regional markets. The approach described herein has been successfully applied elsewhere. More importantly, it is designed to align electricity generation with PR’s changing socioeconomic landscape at zero cost to the government, consumers and businesses. Sometimes, privatization does work.

Puerto Rico Economic Pulse ©

Jul 2017: They Still Don’t Get It

An Analysis of PR’s Fiscal Plan & Budget
On June 30, 2016, President Obama signed into law the federal Puerto Rico Oversight, Management, and Economic Stability Act (PROMESA). Section 1010 of PROMESA created the Financial Oversight and Management Board (FOMB) for Puerto Rico, a seven-member board appointed by the US President for terms of 3 years. The Board has omnipotent powers and neither the Governor nor the Legislature in PR may control the Board. Their charter is to enact fiscal plans and budgets so the Island can return to the financial markets. The question is how will this be achieved. A balanced fiscal budget alone will not rescue the PR economy from its long-term economic recession nor will it stop the outward migration of its residents. Bondholders of PR’s public debt want to be paid but without a growing and vibrant economy, there will not be enough revenues to service this debt and continue providing “essential” government services. This issue addresses the key question of economic policy to restore growth, something which appears “Many, Still Don’t Get It!”

Puerto Rico Compass ©

4Q-2016 Industry Leaders React to New Policies

4Q-2016 industry analysis and PR Administration policies
This edition of Puerto Rico Economic Compass, analyzes the 4Q-2016 economic indices and includes an industry analysis of the PR economy plus economic policies proposed by the new Administration. The elected governor, Ricardo Roselló and the PROMESA Fiscal Oversight Board have certainly altered expectations for 2017. New executive orders, approval of sweeping labor legislation, and continued dialogue with the PROMESA Board regarding key recommendations to be implemented in the near term, have raised both praise and criticism by several industry sectors. For instance, the recently approved Labor Reform Act has been praised and promoted by several industry and retail employers but has met a backlash from many in the labor movement. No doubt, the new government has been very busy trying to adopt and implement the fiscal and economic plan demanded by the PROMESA board since last December. What’s the rest of the story?