Puerto Rico Economic Pulse ©

Nov 2016: Reality Check for Puerto Rico’s Fiscal Plan

Success will depend on the premises it makes
The government’s latest version of its fiscal and economic growth plan has come under close scrutiny since being submitted to the Financial Oversight & Management Control Board (FOMCB) for PR.  Some critics have pointed to its lack of policy specifics while others have scorned the fact that it does not contain a debt sustainability analysis while resting on additional federal funding. The PR fiscal plan (FP) has various technical points and assumptions that have also been singled out. The plan’s viability, regardless of the gaps, will ultimately depend on the validity of its assumptions. Policy makers must find a way to boost PR’s long-term potential output first but the appointed board may want to restructure public debt obligation first. Growing the economy will ensure that the future roadmap rests on credible future income flows. This edition of the Pulse takes a look at the fundamental assumptions behind the fiscal plan.

Puerto Rico Compass ©

Q3 2016 – Is Election 2016 Different for Puerto Rico?

Does the upcoming race change anything?
With elections just around the corner, do Puerto Ricans think the next Governor will have a profound impact on the economy? This issue of Compass analyzes the performance of HCCG’s six quarterly indices during the past non-election years compared with historical election years from 2000 thru 2012 and this year’s results. Find out if the consumer index tracks Puerto Ricans’ sense of financial security in their spending patterns. However, banking, construction, and manufacturing as well as the coincident index suggest the results of this election could prolong the lengthy economic recession of the past 11 years. Any election year brings uncertainty and many business owners could be hesitant to make long-term decisions. To complicate matters, the recently US Congress mandated Fiscal Control Board has absolute powers over the administration of the Island until fiscal discipline is restored, public debt is serviced, and there is access to financial markets. What is certain is that all of this will take years in the making.

Puerto Rico Economic Pulse ©

Oct 2016 – One More Time: Puerto Rico’s Agenda

Election 2016 – Analysis of Economic Platforms
On November 8th, 2016, Puerto Ricans will face a stark choice between six governor candidacies, consisting of 4 political parties and 2 independent candidates. According to recent polls, independent candidates are attracting 22% of voters. Still, Ricardo Rossello from the NPP and David Bernier from the PDP are leading the polls to be the next Governor of PR. However, with the recent approval of a US Congress mandated Fiscal Control Board for PR, most people consider the elected governor and the legislature will have limited powers and areas of influence. Under these circumstances, the next four years will be tough for the new government and the people of PR. Economic issues include recession, outmigration, debt payments, retirement and health time bombs, and a harsh relation with the Fiscal Control Board. Voters in PR will have to analyze carefully the various platforms of these candidates and determine if some of these measures are economically unfeasible, not fiscally prudent, unclear; or depict lack of organization and cohesion, among other flaws. Can you judge who might be the better candidate for PR?

Puerto Rico Economic Pulse ©

Sep 2016: Urgency of Now for Credit Cooperatives

An important component of Puerto Rico’s Financial Sector

Believers of the credit-union movement talk of a “social mission”: to serve communities. As of March 2016, credit unions in the Island had 976,550 members with $8.7 billion in total assets. Earnings are returned to members in the form of better interest rates and dividends. Traditionally, credit unions have offered higher rates than banks to savers and lower rates to borrowers. During this financial and current economic crisis in PR, most credit unions have been more resilient than banks. They have been able to compete with banks and small loan companies who complain loudly about credit unions’ exemption from local income tax. Though credit unions may pay no taxes, neither have they needed taxpayers’ money for bailouts, until now. Many credit unions, which purchased PR bonds (currently rated as junk) are facing tough challenges with their capital requirements. Its regulator COSSEC has been considering a “bailout” type of proposal for these credit unions. Will it be enough without endangering their regulartor COSSEC? Find out in this Pulse.

Puerto Rico Economic Pulse ©

November 2015: Of Sun & Sand – Is it Enough?

Challenges facing the tourism sector in Puerto Rico

November 13th terrorist attacks in Paris had a negative impact on tourism. French hotels and restaurants reported a major impact. These events highlight the need for protection from disruption to business and leisure travellers. The 2015 Global Summit in Madrid looked at how companies and destinations go on to reinvent their products, businesses and ways of working, to emerge stronger and more resilient to meet future challenges head on. Realizing these opportunities will require businesses and governments to adopt deeper levels of connectivity, openness, and trust in years to come. Today, travellers are more demanding and make their voice heard around the world, positively or negatively in minutes; and millions of new jobs in the industry will demand people skills and talent. What can PR learn from these new challenges? How do we compare with our Caribbean neighbors? Is PR ready?

Puerto Rico Economic Pulse ©

October 2015: Quo Vadis Puerto Rico – Part II

PR’s proposal for a fiscal & economic growth plan

On October 15, 2015, the PR House of Representatives and the Senate presented bills for the fiscal and economic recovery of PR. This call to action responds to a plan for FY2016-2022 submitted by a Working Group (WG), designated by Governor Alejandro García Padilla. The plan includes several measures and calls for a Fiscal Control Board (FCB) to be appointed by Governor Padilla but all this has not yet been approved by the PR Legislature. The task of the FCB is to approve a final detailed fiscal and economic plan by December 2015. This issue focuses on analyzing the WG’s plan and its FCB. Several questions remain unanswered throughout this process. For instance, is the underlying assumption that fixing the fiscal crisis will promote economic growth? What has been the experience of fiscal control boards in the US, such as, NYC, DC, and Detroit? Where do we stand now.

Puerto Rico Compass ©

Q3 2015: Recession’s Sharp Bite Continues

Puerto Rico’s sagging economy, 3Q-2015

It will take more than patience to free the PR economy from nine years of negative real growth. Failure to design and execute earlier in 2013 an effective economic plan explains in part our current situation and doing nothing is no option. It is important to understand if the continued declines in the 6 quarterly indices of HCCG for the PR economy are a cyclical phenomenon or a longer-lasting transition to a new, slower state. During Q3-2015, PR continued facing fiscal challenges with a shortfall of liquidity for payment of public debt service; a continued challenge with restructuring of the PR Electric Power Authority and other public debt; hearings before US Congress in an effort to present PR’s dire fiscal and economic situation to obtain some relief; a move to avert an upcoming cut in Medicaid and Medicare Advantage funds; and last minute amendments to a legislated 4% B2B service tax, among others. The prospect of a government shutdown is madness. All quarterly indices indicate nothing seems right. What is the right response?

Puerto Rico Economic Pulse ©

August 2015: Deep Cuts to Medicare Advantage

On the consequences for PR’s health care system

In 2010, President Obama expanded healthcare in the US through the Affordable Care Act. Since April 2014, more than 7 million have signed up for private coverage, thereby reducing the number of uninsured in the US to its lowest level since 2008 and significantly raising payments. To reign in the expenses, Obamacare lowered Medicare spending by $716 billion from 2013 to 2022. Of this, $156 billion comes from Medicare Advantage (MA), which lets the elderly use public money to buy private health plans. Private insurers passed along the extra subsidy to consumers in the form of additional benefits or lower fees. Obamacare sought to bring private payments in line with traditional Medicare. But now, Medicare Advantage has become increasingly popular with about three in ten Medicare beneficiaries enrolled in a private plan in the US. In contrast, this proportion is about seven in ten in PR. Insurers argued that Obamacare’s cuts would force them to raise prices or cut benefits. CMS raised payments for the states but cut 11% for PR in 2016. Find out the consequences of this decision.

Puerto Rico Economic Pulse ©

July 2015: PR’s Future is Nearing Its Hour of Truth

The Island’s economic prospects are being reshaped by the day

A series of rapidly developing events are drastically—but not unexpectedly—reshaping PR’s development and growth possibilities. In all likelihood, the end result of the ongoing negotiations will impose strict limitations to the government’s ability to play an active role in the economy, a dramatic shift from its historical role. As a result and for the first time in PR’s modern economic history, the market will largely and freely drive economic activity in the Island. This may not be all that bad. In fact, the emerging landscape should be populated by competitive albeit small businesses, some of which will supply foreign markets. Furthermore, the economy will tend to reallocate its resources to those areas in which it can produce with competitive—and comparative—advantages and it is in this sense, that the current crisis is nurturing future opportunities. The road for the next decade may be bumpy but rewarding.

Puerto Rico Compass ©

Q2 2015: Casualties of PR’s Economic Recession

A snapshot in Q2-2015

The six quarterly indices for the Puerto Rico economy have one thing in common: they are all in negative territory. The Construction index in particular continues to pull down economic recovery in the near future. Other indicators reflect consumer’s lack of confidence in a labor market that continues struggling, a suspect deflationary environment awaiting the impact of a higher SUT tax effective July 1, 2015, and a financial sector that continues downsizing. Thus the island is “not poised for a growth spurt once the fiscal cliff and payment of public debt are normalized.” Some moves in the leading index may be promising, particularly as oil prices continue to tumble and interest rates remain low. The private sector jobs have not been able to neutralize the reduction and attrition in government jobs. Housing sales are flat and do not spur new construction in the near term. Compared to the US and some of its regions, Puerto Rico’s economy continues to struggle and international financial markets are not inclined to lend to the once frequent and desirable municipal bond issuer.