Puerto Rico Economic Pulse ©

08/18: Code of Conduct – Fiscal Oversight Board

Insights into the fiscal discipline of PROMESA staff in Puerto Rico

Code of Conduct – Fiscal Oversight Board Puerto RicoPuerto Rico’s fiscal and economic crisis has thrust people into unlikely roles. On June 2016, President Barack Obama signed the legislation Puerto Rico Oversight Management, & Economic Stability Act to address Puerto Rico’s economic crisis. The Act established a 7-member oversight board with an Executive Director and staff to, among other things, provide Puerto Rico with tools to impose discipline over its finances, meet is obligations, and restore confidence in its institutions. The Board has sweeping powers over the Island and its staff has a significant and increasing budget, paid by PR taxpayers, to execute those powers. After the devastation of Hurricane Maria on September 2017, the economic reconstruction of the Island becomes even more important for PR to meet its fiscal and debt obligations. Is the entity in charge of balancing fiscal budgets and controlling expenses in PR applying these same principles to its expenses? It is in this context that this issue analyzes how the administrative staff of the Fiscal Board stacks against results.

Puerto Rico Compass ©

Q2-2018: Impact of Millions in Puerto Rico

Analysis of Puerto Rico’s Q2-2018 Economic Indices
Economic recoveryAlmost 11 months have gone by since hurricanes Irma and Maria struck the Island in September 2017. The unconvincing and uneven economic recovery is a deterrence for attracting new investments to the Island. Construction and consumption are the biggest winners in this quarter and the other quarterly indices have also improved, but will this trend continue? What is the real amount of federal disaster funds allocated for Puerto Rico? Given the impact of the recent hurricanes, have all relevant federal agencies seen an increase in their budgets for Puerto Rico? Has the job market shown clear signs of recovery in 2Q-2018? This issue answers some of these questions and analyzes the post hurricane economic situation by sector.

04/2018: A New Privatization Model for PREPA

Competition can support Puerto Rico’s future

PrivatizationThe aftermath of hurricanes Irma and Maria essentially sealed PR Electric Power Authority’s (PREPA) fate, at least in its current legal form. The magnitude of the physical destruction experienced both by its generation capacity and its distribution networks renewed historical calls for its privatization. That possibility now seems irreversible, particularly given the Fiscal Oversight Board’s (FOB) drive to impose austerity across the public sector and the government’s market-friendliness inclination. However, not all privatization processes are the same and, by extension, not all lead to the same outcome. This issue of Pulse presents a novel approach to privatization—one based on the controlled introduction of competition in regional markets. The approach described herein has been successfully applied elsewhere. More importantly, it is designed to align electricity generation with PR’s changing socioeconomic landscape at zero cost to the government, consumers and businesses. Sometimes, privatization does work.

Puerto Rico Compass ©

Q42017: A Shattered Economy After Hurricane Maria

Shattered EconomyAnalysis of 4th Quarter 2017 economic indices

At the end of 2017, PR exhibits a shattered economy with a broken infrastructure due the devastation of hurricane Maria on September 20, 2017. As of January 2018, more than 400,000 clients or 30% of PREPA’s clients still had no electricity. As analyzed in our previous Q3 issue, a fast recovery of electricity is a key factor in the island’s economic recovery. Other basic infrastructure, such as, water, communications, and roads continue to have problems. The lack of a fully operational and reliable infrastructure is hitting businesses as well as households. With lower demand and rising operational costs, many businesses have reached the point of no return and have closed or filed for bankruptcy. Families have chosen the option of mass migration, particularly to the USA. HCCG’s six quarterly economic indices highlight the effects of the broken infrastructure and a weak economy in the post Maria era.

Puerto Rico Economic Pulse ©

12/2017 The Perfect Storm in 2017

Irma, Maria, and the US Tax Reform
The Perfect StormOn Wednesday December 20th, 2017, the House of Representatives joined the Senate in passing the US Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. This is a major overhaul of the US tax code that will substantially cut corporate tax rates on a permanent basis and tax cuts to households that will expire over the next decade. It will also increase the Federal deficit by $1.5 trillion and adversely hits Puerto Rico as “collateral damage”. PR will remember 2017 as the year of the perfect storm with category 5 hurricanes Irma and Maria in September and the US tax reform. The latter threatens 50% of our GDP, 288,000 direct and indirect jobs, and 33% of the central government budget. The hurricanes destroyed PR’s electrical grid; uncovered the face of poverty; bankrupted many small and medium businesses; incentivized massive migration to the US, and further curtailed PR’s autonomy to govern itself as Congress mandated a Fiscal Supervisory Board. Will business and financiers gamble on PR?

 

Puerto Rico Economic Pulse ©

Nov 2017 The Other Side of Maria: Poverty Uncovered

A comparative analysis over time
Since 1970, official statistics corroborate that Puerto Rico made significant advances on the war on poverty. Economic growth and federal assistance in the Island were responsible for poverty reduction. On September 20th, hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico leaving major economic damages and wiping out most of the vegetation in the Island. Besides its physical and economic impact, Maria also uncovered the poverty that exists in the Island and which makes us the poorest jurisdiction among the 50 States and PR. The face of poverty includes children, women, blacks, and the mountain area in PR. This issue addresses how poverty has changed in PR, what was the profile of poor people before Maria, what are the welfare programs to fight poverty, and what will it take to halt the increase in poverty levels caused after hurricane Maria.

Poverty Uncovered

Puerto Rico Economic Pulse ©

Sep/Oct 2017: Puerto Rico – Submerged and in Darkness

Highlights of Economic Impact of Hurricane Maria

More than a month has passed since hurricane Maria ravaged the island of PR. The recovery efforts have been slow and insufficient. As of today, 25% of households have no water service; 75% remain in darkness without electricity; 35% of Puerto Ricans do not have telecommunications services. Sensing this lack of progress, many Puerto Ricans have opted to leave the island in search of greener pastures in the mainland. Florida alone has received upwards of 67,000 “refugees” since the storm hit the island on September 20th. The situation is dire to say the least. With a destroyed infrastructure, lack of water and power, and an accelerated pace of emigration, businesses and government desperately need to perform a comprehensive assessment of economic damages, identify risks and opportunities, measure, manage, and minimize risks now and in next few years. This Pulse is a teaser of a comprehensive study HCCG is preparing regarding the impact of hurricane Maria and how it forges Puerto Rico’s economic future.

How Hurricane María forges PR's Economic Future
Click on the image to order the Full How Hurricane María forges Puerto Rico’s Economic Future Economic Impact Study